Subspace

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(''Star Trek'' Subspace)
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==''Star Trek'' Subspace==
 
==''Star Trek'' Subspace==
In Star Trek, subspace lies behind many futuristic technologies.  "Subspace fields" allow ships to travel at faster-than-light speeds, for instance.  Messages transmitted through subspace also travel faster-than-light.  [[Mass-lightening]] is another subspace technology that somehow reduces the inertial mass of a starship, allowing it to accelerate quickly with a small amount of thrust for its true mass.
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In Star Trek, subspace lies behind many futuristic technologies.  "Subspace fields" allow ships to travel at faster-than-light speeds, for instance.  Messages transmitted through subspace also travel faster-than-light.  [[Mass lightening]] is another subspace technology that somehow reduces the inertial mass of a starship, allowing it to accelerate quickly with a small amount of thrust for its true mass.
  
 
Normally, subspace only influences objects in normal space within the confines of a technologically created subspace field.  The separation between normal space and subspace can thin, however, where intense subspace fields are used regularly.  For example, constant warp-speed starship traffic through the Hekaras Corridor thinned the barrier between normal space and subspace, and the subsequent self-destruction of a starship's warp drive in the corridor created a rift between the dimensions. (TNG, "Force of Nature")
 
Normally, subspace only influences objects in normal space within the confines of a technologically created subspace field.  The separation between normal space and subspace can thin, however, where intense subspace fields are used regularly.  For example, constant warp-speed starship traffic through the Hekaras Corridor thinned the barrier between normal space and subspace, and the subsequent self-destruction of a starship's warp drive in the corridor created a rift between the dimensions. (TNG, "Force of Nature")

Revision as of 20:41, 27 March 2008

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