Canon

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(Star Trek canon)
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==Star Trek canon==
 
==Star Trek canon==
  
The creator of Star Trek, Gene Roddenberry once said that "It isn't Star Trek until I say it's Star Trek." This statement generally isn't taken seriously however, as it would render all material made since late 1991 non-canon. In practice, all on-screen material from the ten films and five television series is considered to be canon (Star Trek: The Animated Series isn't normally considered canon, but generally isn't contradicted by the following films and series, either). The impending eleventh film might further complicate matters, but this is how it stands for the time being.
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The creator of Star Trek, Gene Roddenberry once said that "It isn't Star Trek until I say it's Star Trek." This statement generally isn't taken seriously however, as it would render all material made since late 1991 non-canon. In practice, only on-screen live action material from the ten films and five television series is considered to be canon.
  
Star Trek also has its own novel series. The rules for this are defined by the Pocket Books (the arm of Paramount in charge of the novels) submission guide, which states that continuity with the films and shows must always be respected, and while contradicting other novels is discouraged, it's not actually forbidden. This in effect means that Star Trek is divided into two canon levels, roughly equivalent to the G-Level and N-Levels of Star Wars.
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Star Trek also has its own novel series. The rules for this are defined by the Pocket Books (the arm of Paramount in charge of the novels) submission guide, which states that continuity with the films and shows must always be respected, and while contradicting other novels is discouraged, it's not actually forbidden.
  
 
Some confusion was raised when Star Trek: Voyager producer Jeri Taylor wrote two novels (''Mosaic'' and ''Pathways'') and declared them to be canon. This was mainly for the purposes of providing background for Captain Janeway; the details in the book were not picked up on by other writers however, and parts of the book were later contradicted outright on the show, firmly establishing the book as non-canon, an establishment strengthened when a statement was released reinforcing the fact that all the Star Trek books are effectively non-canon.
 
Some confusion was raised when Star Trek: Voyager producer Jeri Taylor wrote two novels (''Mosaic'' and ''Pathways'') and declared them to be canon. This was mainly for the purposes of providing background for Captain Janeway; the details in the book were not picked up on by other writers however, and parts of the book were later contradicted outright on the show, firmly establishing the book as non-canon, an establishment strengthened when a statement was released reinforcing the fact that all the Star Trek books are effectively non-canon.

Revision as of 16:25, 8 November 2007

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