Canon

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The age-old question of '''Canon''' is one of the most salient points of the debate, and has perhaps substituted the actual technical debates as the key issue in the whole Star Wars vs. Star Trek debate.
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The age-old question of '''Canon''' is one of the most salient points of the debate, and has perhaps substituted the actual technical debates as the key issue in the whole Star Wars vs. Star Trek argument.
  
 
==What is canon?==
 
==What is canon?==
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The creator of Star Trek, Gene Roddenberry once said that "It isn't Star Trek until I say it's Star Trek." This statement generally isn't taken seriously however, as it would render all material made since late 1991 non-canon. In practice, all on-screen material from the ten films and five television series is considered to be canon (Star Trek: The Animated Series isn't normally considered canon, but generally isn't contradicted by the following films and series, either). The impending eleventh film might further complicate matters, but this is how it stands for the time being.
 
The creator of Star Trek, Gene Roddenberry once said that "It isn't Star Trek until I say it's Star Trek." This statement generally isn't taken seriously however, as it would render all material made since late 1991 non-canon. In practice, all on-screen material from the ten films and five television series is considered to be canon (Star Trek: The Animated Series isn't normally considered canon, but generally isn't contradicted by the following films and series, either). The impending eleventh film might further complicate matters, but this is how it stands for the time being.
  
Star Trek also has its own novel series. The rules for this are defined by the Pocket Books (the arm of Paramount in charge of the novels) submission guide, which states that continuity with the films and shows must always be respected, and while contradicting other novels is discouraged, it's not actually forbidden. This in effect means that Star Trek is divided into two canon levels, roughly equivalent to the G-Level and N-Nevels of Star Wars.
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Star Trek also has its own novel series. The rules for this are defined by the Pocket Books (the arm of Paramount in charge of the novels) submission guide, which states that continuity with the films and shows must always be respected, and while contradicting other novels is discouraged, it's not actually forbidden. This in effect means that Star Trek is divided into two canon levels, roughly equivalent to the G-Level and N-Levels of Star Wars.
  
Some confusion was raised when Star Trek: Voyager producer Jeri Taylor wrote two novels (''Mosaic'' and ''Pathways'') and declared them to be canon. This was mainly for the purposes of providing background for Captain Janeway; the details in the book were not picked up on by other writers however, and parts of the book were later contradicted outright on the show, firmly establishing the book as non-canon, an establishment strengthened when a statement was released that reinforced the fact that all the Star Trek books are effectively Non-canon.
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Some confusion was raised when Star Trek: Voyager producer Jeri Taylor wrote two novels (''Mosaic'' and ''Pathways'') and declared them to be canon. This was mainly for the purposes of providing background for Captain Janeway; the details in the book were not picked up on by other writers however, and parts of the book were later contradicted outright on the show, firmly establishing the book as non-canon, an establishment strengthened when a statement was released reinforcing the fact that all the Star Trek books are effectively non-canon.
  
 
==The Canon Debate==
 
==The Canon Debate==
  
Despite both Lucasfilm and Paramount making relatively clear statements on the canon and continuity of their respective series', some have chosen to argue against these positions. The most common claim is that no Star Wars material other than the films is canon, and this is usually "supported" by a quote by George Lucas, saying that the films are supposedly in a "parallel universe" and "don't intrude on the films, but intrude between them." While this is generally understood as meaning that the novels and other official material is not allowed to contradict the films but is otherwise entirely valid, some have chosen to interpret Lucas' statements as meaning that the novels take place in a separate reality, and therefore (for some reason) have no validity.
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Despite both Lucasfilm and Paramount making relatively clear statements on the canon and continuity of their respective series', some have chosen to argue against these positions. The most common claim is that no Star Wars material other than the films is canon, and this is usually "supported" by a quote by George Lucas, saying that the films are supposedly in a "parallel universe" and "don't intrude on the films, but intrude between them." While this is generally understood as meaning that the novels and other official materials are not allowed to contradict the films but are otherwise entirely valid, some have chosen to interpret Lucas' statements as meaning that the novels take place in a separate reality, and therefore (for some reason) have no validity.
  
 
There are also those who try and claim that the Star Trek novels are canon, but this position is much rarer, as the Trek novels being canon would not greatly benefit the overall chances of the Star Trek side.
 
There are also those who try and claim that the Star Trek novels are canon, but this position is much rarer, as the Trek novels being canon would not greatly benefit the overall chances of the Star Trek side.
  
 
[[Category:Debate]]
 
[[Category:Debate]]

Revision as of 12:09, 8 November 2007

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