Star Trek Canon Database

Displaying 1 to 9 of 9 records.

Database started: 1999-07-27
Page generated: 2014-10-23

Page 1

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

BEVERLY: RVN is one of the key factors in our development during puberty. Unlike DNA, which never  changes, RVN takes on additional viroxic sequences during adolescence. Those sequences determine how we develop physically. Without them...

RIKER: We would never mature into adults.

BEVERLY: Exactly. Somehow, those key sequences were eliminated in the Captain and the others during transport.

...

BEVERLY: If the Transporter only registered part of their RVN patterns ... that would explain why the key sequences are missing.

GEORDI: Exactly. And without those key sequences, the Transporter reconstructed them as children.

Transporters: they "reconstruct" people when there's missing data. O'Brien once said that transporters never experience serious problems, but that's because they're masking any problems that occur.

One must wonder why they don't use this as a fountain of youth. The events of Insurrection reveal the value of a "fountain of youth" to the Federation, but it would seem that they've had one within their grasp all along. Perhaps the conditions present in this situation were not easily duplicated, or the attempt to duplicate this incident is dangerous. A few deaths would quickly dissuade people from attempting the process ...

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

GEORDI: It's not tritanium anymore. Somehow the molecular structure of the alloy's been changed -- broken down into its constituent elements.

O'BRIEN: No wonder the bulkhead shattered.

Realism: they have something called "tritanium", which is not an element despite its name, but an "alloy". But they're not finished there; they say that it has a "molecular structure" rather than the promiscuous metallic lattice structure typical of metals. Does this mean that they have something called "tritanium" which is a non-metallic compound and yet is designated as an "alloy?" This bears no resemblance to any materials science that I've ever heard of.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

DATA: We have been scanning the area since entering the system, but our readings are being disrupted.

RIKER: Cause?

DATA: Extreme fluctuations in the E.M. field.

Sensors: EM field fluctuations make them useless.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

SCREENPLAY: 2 Ferengi, Berik and Morta, materialize on the bridge with alien rifles drawn.

BERIK: Put down your weapons.

SCREENPLAY: Worf draws his phaser and fires as he dives for cover, but misses ... the Ferengi loosen a couple of blasts at Worf and Data, hitting them both.

Computers and Androids: Worf and Data are soundly defeated by a pair of Ferengis. And Worf reacts before Data does! Absolutely pathetic. Note that all of this happens on the bridge, so all of the shots must have been at twenty feet range or less.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

RIKER: I hope your profit margin is pretty high on this little adventure, Lurin... because you're risking war with the Federation.

LURIN: We're not affiliated with the Ferengi Alliance. We're in business for ourselves. And yes, it will be highly profitable. For an investment of two surplus Klingon ships, a few repairs, and some weapons, we've netted a Federation starship and her crew, not to mention a planet rich in Vendarite.

Replicators: obviously, naturally occuring "vendarite" ore is worth something if they're willing to risk attacking a Federation ship in order to get access to it. So I guess that means they can't replicate it.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

RIKER: I hope your profit margin is pretty high on this little adventure, Lurin... because you're risking war with the Federation.

LURIN: We're not affiliated with the Ferengi Alliance. We're in business for ourselves. And yes, it will be highly profitable. For an investment of two surplus Klingon ships, a few repairs, and some weapons, we've netted a Federation starship and her crew, not to mention a planet rich in Vendarite.

Misc: the Klingon Empire is not above selling its warships. This may be indicative of either a government eager to sell its technology to the highest bidder, or a problem with serious corruption at lower levels.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

RIKER: So that's what this is all about. What did you do with the science team that was on the surface?

LURIN: They have proved most... helpful in extracting the mineral.

RIKER: You made them slave laborers.

LURIN: The addition of your crew will greatly speed up the process. As for your ship... I'm sure it will fetch a handsome price on the Romulan market. But before that can happen, we need to regain access to your central computer.

RIKER: You don't really think I'm going to help you.

Misc: the mining process is apparently still quite labour-intensive, just as it was on Bajor during the Cardassian Occupation.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

RIKER: So that's what this is all about. What did you do with the science team that was on the surface?

LURIN: They have proved most... helpful in extracting the mineral.

RIKER: You made them slave laborers.

LURIN: The addition of your crew will greatly speed up the process. As for your ship... I'm sure it will fetch a handsome price on the Romulan market. But before that can happen, we need to regain access to your central computer.

RIKER: You don't really think I'm going to help you.

Naval Tactics: Riker knew they were being boarded, but he didn't destroy the ship. He could have easily set the self-destruct order verbally, but the thought didn't even occur to him. Typical.

TNG Season 6, Ep# 133: "Rascals"

LURIN: We Ferengi do not bring our offspring along with us aboard ships.

RIKER: Then I suppose that's your loss. We consider our families to be one of our strengths.

LURIN: I think you will find they can also be a weakness. Unless you release the computer to our control, I will execute every child on this ship ... beginning with yours.

RIKER: Even you aren't that cruel.

LURIN: It is cruel to put children in danger by bringing them aboard a starship in the first place.

Culture: Lurin is absolutely right; it is callous and irresponsible to put children onto a military vessel which is routinely ordererd into dangerous situations. But none of the officers on the Enterprise seem to realize that.

Logan Gish points out that it might have been more than irresponsible; it may be deliberate endangerment. It's no secret that the Federation espouses all the values of militarism (obedience to the state, loyalty to the state, refusal to question the state's motives, jingoistism, military duty is the highest and most noble calling, keep no secrets from the state, allow the state to keep secrets from you, etc), and by putting families aboard military ships, the Federation tries to ensure the loyalty and utmost efforts of its crew. After all, if they fail, their families die. The Roman Empire employed a similar policy (punishing the families of deserters), as did the Nazis.

Page 1

Search Database Again

Series: Category:
Episode Name:
Search for key words:
Search for exact phrase
(in quotes):
Search for exact phrase
(in analysis):
Search Notes:
  • Key word searches assume a Boolean "AND" between all search terms.
  • Search terms will be highlighted (in bold orange) in the results.


Valid HTML 4.01!Valid CSS!This website is owned and maintained by Michael Wong
This site is not affiliated with Lucasfilm or Paramount
All associated materials are used under "Fair Use" provisions of copyright law.
All original content by Michael Wong is copyrighted © 1998,2004.
Click here to go to the main page